Plastic Shipping Bags for Preserving the Products

Try saying that three times fast. The title, I mean. It’s a lot harder than it looks. Taking the time to really punch out the Ps is not popular with the mouth’s ability to pronounce. Anyway, I could probably proceed for the rest of this post using mostly Ps, and I wouldn’t even be practicing it on purpose- Apparently I need something to cleanse the palate…

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

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Okay, so, have you received a care package in the mail? If you are like most people than you probably have, and if you aren’t than I would like to apologize in advance. Now, getting into specifics. Have you ever received a care package that was improperly packaged? This would typically involve opening the box and seeing that everything was in its original state, with nothing segregated. Why should this matter? When dealing with edible and inedible products this matters very much. Following is a list of helpful tips for sending off care packages that can be received and taken full advantage with the full effect. In short: the package deal.

  • First, get yours hands on some plastic shipping bags. I don’t care if it’s a leftover grocery bag, or a sandwich baggie. Any bag becomes part of the plastic shipping bags family when it comes time to send off a care package.
  • Separate food items from non-food items, and completely wrap both parties. In the military, it was common for entire care packages to be thrown out simply because the generous senders had neglected to extra-wrap the soap. It doesn’t matter if a bar of soap comes wrapped in paper, and a candy-bar comes in plastic. If you don’t create even more of a barrier (hint hint, plastic shipping bags) that candy bar is going to taste like Zest. And that sucks. It sucks enough being on a deployment. Trying to eat a Snickers that tastes like the shower just adds insult to injury.
  • It goes without saying that plastic shipping bags could relieve most of the heartache that comes with a leaky product, and yet so many people fail to follow this simple step. Altitude changes will cause bottles to burst, and for whatever reason batteries often decide to release their hazardous fluids. Wrapping items appropriately can save the cookies from getting a bath, or the mustache socks from deteriorating in acid.

Plastic Packaging Bags: A Win/Win

When it comes to packaging and shipping, it would behoove us not to forget about plastic packaging bags. These might seem like an inconsequential byproduct, but without them there wouldn’t be so much a point of packaging or shipping what we are trying to work with. For instance, those coffee beans you’ve invested your life savings into growing, you wouldn’t just throw a handful of beans in a box and send them on their way.

Can you imagine buying some supposed home-grown, one-of-a-kind, best-coffee-beans-in-the-world but they are just floating around in a box? No way! You would absolutely want to put them in a coffee bag. I suppose you’ve never thought of coffee bags as plastic packaging bags before, but they really are. At PackagingSupplies.com you can buy them in half-pound or one pound sizes, and in brown or white.

Packaging Bags

If you don’t think you need them because you aren’t mailing anything, think again. If you have a local coffee shop, you are still going to be selling those beans. I highly doubt you would want to be putting them in little sandwich baggies. I don’t think anyone would buy a specialized product like coffee beans if the proprietor didn’t take their product seriously enough to even package them appropriately. Or at least I wouldn’t. I’d buy a home-made rice krispies treat in a plastic baggie. Not so much some coffee beans.

How about the very opposite end of the spectrum: electronics. That is about as opposite as you can get from coffee beans, right? You need very specific plastic packaging bags for electronics. Once again, the throwing-in-a-box analogy: you don’t just throw circuit boards in a box and send them on their way. There would be no point in spending the money on shipping. You might as well just throw your money right into the trash can. You will absolutely want static shielding bags.

PackagingSupplies.com sells them open-ended, or ziploc style. These are a very cool addition to the family plastic packaging bags. Somehow, these bags are designed to not produce static electricity. Static electricity can easily damage sensitive material. At PackagingSupplies.com you can get the static shielding plastic packaging bags in really little (3 X 5) or in pretty big (14 X 18). That’s small enough for a watch, and big enough for a lap top.

I encourage you to invest in those seemingly inconsequential byproducts, so that your product can be treated the way it is meant to be treated, and can be sold the way it is meant to be sold. It’s a win/win.