Crafting a Box with Compartments

Most things you’re finished with end up in the trash. That’s the nature of things in modern society, right? Outside of trying to recycle materials and different food wastes, there’s not as many options out there but to trash it. Candy boxes (like chocolate boxes) really aren’t any different. But there’s something unique about these boxes that make them more than trash and that’s their small compartments in the tray.

How else would you repurpose such a box, though? Well, to start, the small divided sections could be used for jewelry or even as a sewing kit. Just think about it: with 10 or more sectioned off compartments, you could put anything from earrings to necklaces and spools of thread to needles in each.

First, remove the tray from the box.

While the tray itself is very useful and the centerpoint of this project, you won’t want to be putting your jewelry in a box of candy. Rather, you’ll want to put the tray in something else homemade that you can call your own.

Spray paint tray preferred color.

Most of these trays are white when you purchase candy boxes. For the most part, that’s not a color that will make your jewelry look great or offset their multiple hues. Instead, think about spray painting the tray a matte black, purple, or even turquoise. These are all colors that set off the luster of precious metals and can allow gems to shine even brighter.

Craft a small wooden box to fit the tray.

Here’s where a little bit of actual work may need to be done outside of the tray itself. You’ll want to measure the dimensions of the plastic tray to make sure it fits in whatever wooden box you choose or make. The best part about this box is that you can customize it till your heart’s content.

Place everything within!

Whether you place earrings near each other or scatter your various spools of thread out in the different compartments, do it in a way that each piece has its own snug place to sit. This also helps you to keep everything in order and easily located for when you’re choosing an item. Again, you can feel free to include any type of jewelry you want, or you can go a different route like using sewing materials or anything else you may be able to store. Your mind is the limit here, so long as the items are able to fit in the container’s trays.

What to Do with Your Collection of Cardboard Over Time

Over the past 10 months, I’ve accumulated quite the collection of large cardboard boxes. The funny thing is, I thought we had all the furniture and other amenities we needed upon moving in.

Yet here we are with multiple large boxes from random things as time has gone on. It just goes to show how you never really realize how much you add to your home on a yearly basis. Things just sort of add up over time and you never actually think you’re adding much to your place.

TV.

We had to have a new television for the basement (i.e., our hang out spot) when we moved in. While I opted to get a cheaper and smaller TV since it wouldn’t be our primary one, the box it came in actually has taken up quite a bit of space the past half year. While I’ve been keeping it behind our couch, I finally pulled it out recently to recycle it. It felt good to get that out of the basement!

Dartboard.

Ahhh, the true entertainment of the basement. We enjoy playing darts, especially steel tip. Well, we mounted a dartboard and cabinet in our basement after receiving it as a Christmas gift. Guess where its box ended up? Yep, right there in the basement alongside the other TV box that we had neglected to recycle. Just as we made sure to recycle our TV box, though, we did the same with the dartboard’s housing box.

Fire pit.

Well, it’s not an actual fire pit that we built from scratch (otherwise it wouldn’t have its own box). For Easter we just received a nice little porch fire pit with its own basin and dome cage on top of it. It’ll be the perfect addition to summer evenings with friends and family. It’s quite a large box itself, and since we haven’t been able to get it out to assemble it yet, the box itself likely will hang around our place for another month or so before I decide to get it along to the recycling center.

Ultimately, we’ve come into possession of quite a bit of cardboard boxes since we moved in last June. I’m just glad we’ve done our part in recycling all the material over time (even if it’s been sitting around in our place, making a mess all the while waiting to be recycled). Heck, we even used one of the cardboard boxes as our cardboard recycling container. O the irony.

Easter is Near

With April showing showing its face and spring finally in the air, there’s one thought on a lot of kids’ minds: Easter.

And with Easter at the forefront of a lot of kids’ minds, parents everywhere are starting to think of what they’ll fill their children’s Easter baskets with this year. Perhaps it’s a few candy boxes, some fake grass, and a video game. Maybe they’re choosing to give something more nontraditional like a plant to take care of or tickets to a music or sporting event.

However you choose to celebrate Easter, whether it’s for the religious aspect of it all or more from a seasonal standpoint, you almost definitely celebrate it in some fashion in America.

I remember growing up and always getting a basket full of different candies, sometimes apparel, and always some eggs with cash and other candies within. While I don’t consider myself an atypical child growing up, I definitely wasn’t about all the kinds of candies that came with Easter. Rather, I was more interested in what my parents (i.e., the Easter Bunny) would put in my basket that was unexpected.

I think one year I ended up with a video game that I’d been wanting for awhile. That was pretty unexpected, as I always looked at my Easter gifts as something below 20 bucks. Another year, I ended up with a spring jacket that was warm enough to ward off bitter winds and rain yet light enough to wear when the temperature began to rise.

No matter the reasons I celebrate Easter down the road, though, I’ll be sure to make it a fun event for my children. While the abundance of candy boxes and chocolate eggs won’t ever leave the tradition, I’m quite excited to put things like books, accessories, and useful items in their basket to show them that it’s more than just about the candy.

Of course, I don’t think I could ever forget the egg hunts I participated in growing up, so I want to make sure that I keep that tradition going for my children someday, too. That’s undoubtedly the best thing for all kids every time spring comes around: who can find the most eggs and how much money is within all of them.

While Easter means one thing to others, it’s always signified life and regrowth to me. More than anything, I’ve learned to appreciate the holiday as a celebration of the new season and new plant and animal life after winter’s long stay.

The Film Industry’s Money-Making Model

Going to the theater has been an American pastime for over a century now, and the film industry is still going strong. In fact, I’d wager that it’s here to stay solely because that’s where a lot of films make their most revenue, thus actors and producers and directors get paid. If it were simply up to releasing DVDs and content on streaming devices, they wouldn’t make nearly as much. The whole idea that new films are “exclusive” to theaters is what drives such large turnout and keeps the film industry going.

It’s funny for me to think about, though. I can’t say I go to the movies but one time a year. So, from my own perspective it seems as if the film industry isn’t nearly what it was when I was a child. But there’s really no truth to that thought whatsoever simply because I’m merely going off of my own experiences with the theaters.

I think part of the problem with me not visiting anymore has to do with my waning interest in newer films. The more I watch Netflix, the less I take interest in shows that are live on TV and films new to theaters. It’s a natural occurrence to me, especially because so much of the cost to going to a theater is calculated in the gas, the tickets, and the snacks there alone. I could save far more money by sitting on my couch, cooking up something for myself, and watching something on my streaming service. The “newness” of something doesn’t excite me like it used to, as I find I greatly enjoy older movies just as much as I would anything newer.

But cost really is a big reason why I just don’t go any longer. I know there are film junkies out there who love seeing a premiere release of something and are the first in line to get there. I’m sure it’s an experience they love and wouldn’t give up, a sort of hobby of theirs. But when I see the prices of candy boxes and popcorn at the theater, it makes me realize how much money those businesses are making on people who are seeing a 2 hour long film that I can see for practically free in just a few months. If I want my own candy boxes, I’ll go to the local grocery store and pay 10 bucks for 10 different candies.

The Film Industry’s Money-Making Model

Going to the theater has been an American pastime for over a century now, and the film industry is still going strong. In fact, I’d wager that it’s here to stay solely because that’s where a lot of films make their most revenue, thus actors and producers and directors get paid. If it were simply up to releasing DVDs and content on streaming devices, they wouldn’t make nearly as much. The whole idea that new films are “exclusive” to theaters is what drives such large turnout and keeps the film industry going.

It’s funny for me to think about, though. I can’t say I go to the movies but one time a year. So, from my own perspective it seems as if the film industry isn’t nearly what it was when I was a child. But there’s really no truth to that thought whatsoever simply because I’m merely going off of my own experiences with the theaters.

I think part of the problem with me not visiting anymore has to do with my waning interest in newer films. The more I watch Netflix, the less I take interest in shows that are live on TV and films new to theaters. It’s a natural occurrence to me, especially because so much of the cost to going to a theater is calculated in the gas, the tickets, and the snacks there alone. I could save far more money by sitting on my couch, cooking up something for myself, and watching something on my streaming service. The “newness” of something doesn’t excite me like it used to, as I find I greatly enjoy older movies just as much as I would anything newer.

But cost really is a big reason why I just don’t go any longer. I know there are film junkies out there who love seeing a premiere release of something and are the first in line to get there. I’m sure it’s an experience they love and wouldn’t give up, a sort of hobby of theirs. But when I see the prices of candy boxes and popcorn at the theater, it makes me realize how much money those businesses are making on people who are seeing a 2 hour long film that I can see for practically free in just a few months. If I want my own candy boxes, I’ll go to the local grocery store and pay 10 bucks for 10 different candies.

Finding Your Home’s Style

I never really knew what it took to reinvigorate a home until I finally moved in with my girlfriend this past year. Before, I was aware that my parents’ house was nicely decorated and “put together”, but I probably couldn’t have told you why.

Now that I’m on my own and we buy our own furniture and decorations, though, I’m starting to realize what it takes to do it all and really put a place together thematically. And let me tell you, it’s really not as easy as it would seem at first. Even deciding on a theme can take awhile to do, and other times, the theme doesn’t really present itself until you’ve already got mostly everything together. It’s a lot tougher than imagining in your mind that you want a rustic living room and that’s that. What makes it rustic? What would be too much rustic and what’s too little? Obviously, putting something like cardboard boxes in a specific room as art (it happens!) may  not fit a rustic theme, but if you’re going for a more industrial look to a room, having cardboard boxes stacked strategically really could work.

Overall, it’s trial and error. I’ll share a few of my style tips below.

Succulents.

I’m a huge fan of live plants in the house. It makes the air more refreshing, oxygenated, and a little more humid to help combat that dry skin during the winter. Succulents, in my opinion, are the most gorgeous indoor plants you could take care of while also being some of the hardiest around. While one species to the next will differ in how you take care of it, succulents are pretty self-reliant for the most part.

Open space and minimal decor.

One problem people run into when they’re trying to bring a theme together in a room is cramming too many things into a small area. If the room is big, it may require bigger pieces of furniture and decor. If it’s smaller, it’ll require smaller things. No matter the size of the room, though, you don’t ever need to cram too many things in at once. While I will admit that part of our place is still open or barren compared to others and could use some decor, I’d rather have that for the time being than too much stuff.

Liquor bottle display.

This one is dependent on your home, the type of liquor you drink, and where you place it, so be careful about putting too much on display in an ill-fitting spot. I just recently got into finer tequilas and mezcals in the past month or two, and I wanted a way to show them off as decoration rather than having a liquor cabinet specifically to dive into for drinks. Our home entertainment system has a lot of shelves and other similar decor, so I figured putting the tequila bottles next to one another on top of the home entertainment system’s bridge would show off my collection well. I wasn’t disappointed in my choice to move them there and they really don’t seem out of place whatsoever.

All I’ll suggest is shying away from cheaper liquors, as no one really cares to see your bottle of Captain Morgan or Jose Cuervo on display above your TV.